How the Bible became the Bible by Donald L. Odell
How the Bible became the Bible by Donald L. Odell
  • "....provides excellent historical background as well as the author's personal history, which enhances his message by providing a glimpse of how the Holy Scripture can really be used." Lee Carroll, author of "Indigo Children" and many "Kyron" books
  • "I just forwarded to friends Balboa's Introduction to your 2nd Edition. Actually Don, I really think this 2nd Edition could not be more timely. I sincerely think there are more people receptive to opening their minds about their programming of religion or the Bible than ever before...." Pat W., (North Carolina)
  • ".... a refreshing synthesis of scholarship and deep personal reflection. Don O’Dell invites us to enter the experience of biblical personalities and groups, and to feel their struggles to find elusive spiritual coherence within their perception of events...." Dr. Jim Nourse, Ph.D., psychologist, acupuncturist and author of Simple Spirituality: Finding Your Own Way, and Opening the Aloha Mind: Healing Self, Healing the World with Ho’oponopono
  • "This highly readable book takes a conversational tone when, for instance, in Chapter 6 (The Time of Jesus), the author gently transitions us from the Old to the New Testament." New Age Retailer
  • "This book is of much value to the serious student of Holy Scripture. It will enable the reader to view the Holy Scriptures in the context in which the books were written and arranged." James J. DeFrancisco, PhD. Miltha Ministries, Mishawaka, Indiana
  • "....provides excellent historical background as well as the author's personal history, which enhances his message by providing a glimpse of how the Holy Scripture can really be used." Lee Carroll, author of "Indigo Children" and many "Kyron" books

2nd Edition, Revised Material

Although the Course does not speak of Thanksgiving, and some of our readers don’t live in the United States, where this is a major holiday, I would like to offer insight into the spirit of this holiday. Traditionally, we in the United States celebrate Thanksgiving as a time when our forefathers, after a hard struggle to survive in a new land, came together to celebrate the fact that they did survive — they made it! Other countries may have a similar type of day with a slightly different form of observance, but what is constant is the desire to celebrate overcoming the struggle and to give thanks.

Perhaps you are going through a struggle right now. Maybe you are exploring a new experience, and you feel like you are on shaky ground. Let us take a moment to give thanks, not necessarily for the struggle but for the fact that we do not go through this alone. We have each other, and we have the power of our Higher Power to transform any struggle in our lives. The Course asks us not to use these struggles as a sign that we are separate from our Higher Power (which is what our egos would like us to do) but as a reminder to give the struggle to Him, who would show us how everything is an opportunity for healing and peace. We might use this affirmation as an invocation for help and healing:

“Take this from me and look upon it, judging it for me.
Let me not see it as a sign of sin and death, nor use it for destruction.
Teach me how not to make of it an obstacle to peace, but let You use it for me, to facilitate its coming.” 

(T-19.IV.C.11)

In admitting this and coming to Him with open hands, we place our Higher Power in control of what we so incapably tried to control. By our release, He will work through our life situations and relationships to help us feel His peace and power. Let us give thanks for His love that is eternal and for His creations of love, which are each of us. “For love cannot be far behind a grateful heart and a thankful mind.” (M-23.4)

Although the Course does not speak of Thanksgiving, and some of our readers don’t live in the United States, where this is a major holiday, I would like to offer insight into the spirit of this holiday. Traditionally, we in the United States celebrate Thanksgiving as a time when our forefathers, after a hard struggle to survive in a new land, came together to celebrate the fact that they did survive — they made it! Other countries may have a similar type of day with a slightly different form of observance, but what is constant is the desire to celebrate overcoming the struggle and to give thanks.

Perhaps you are going through a struggle right now. Maybe you are exploring a new experience, and you feel like you are on shaky ground. Let us take a moment to give thanks, not necessarily for the struggle but for the fact that we do not go through this alone. We have each other, and we have the power of our Higher Power to transform any struggle in our lives. The Course asks us not to use these struggles as a sign that we are separate from our Higher Power (which is what our egos would like us to do) but as a reminder to give the struggle to Him, who would show us how everything is an opportunity for healing and peace. We might use this affirmation as an invocation for help and healing:

“Take this from me and look upon it, judging it for me.
Let me not see it as a sign of sin and death, nor use it for destruction.
Teach me how not to make of it an obstacle to peace, but let You use it for me, to facilitate its coming.” 

(T-19.IV.C.11)

In admitting this and coming to Him with open hands, we place our Higher Power in control of what we so incapably tried to control. By our release, He will work through our life situations and relationships to help us feel His peace and power. Let us give thanks for His love that is eternal and for His creations of love, which are each of us. “For love cannot be far behind a grateful heart and a thankful mind.” (M-23.4)